Micro Burst or Tornado rocks Lake Manassas Today

Posted by Carolyn A. Capalbo on Sunday, July 25th, 2010 at 8:20pm.

Was it a tornado or a micro burst that tore down 3 huge oak trees today in Lake Manassas.  Earlier today, Lake Manassas was ravaged by a severe thunderstorm and possible tornado or micro burst.  The winds and rain were ferocious.  I watched as tree limbs and leaves flew past my window in a short but violent burst that lasted maybe a minute or two.  My team members, Barb and Tave Costa were showing a beautiful home here in the community.  They called me to tell me that they and our clients were blocked in by the fallen giant oak trees.  They were not kidding.  Three giant oak trees reportedly over 150 years old had snapped by the fierce winds during the storm.  Their vehicles were blocked by the trees.  Luckily no one was injured when the trees came crashing down.  The community will clean up and mourn the loss of these stately giants.  Our clients were very good natured about being “trapped” by the trees.  And have declared that this was the most eventful day of house hunting ever! 

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Carolyn Capalbo,
Northern Virginia REALTOR®

 

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1 Response to "Micro Burst or Tornado rocks Lake Manassas Today"

Lynda Bottos wrote: look at the pattern of the fallen trees and debris. If all the debris was moving or fell in the same direction in the neighborhood, chances are it was a weak tornado (F1-F2). If there's a pattern of debris or fallen trees in all directions, like a starburst pattern, or a half-starburst if the microburst was fast moving at the time, then it was most likely a downburst. The pattern, though, could cover 1/4 mile in diameter. here is a link of a typical downburst (or microburst since it covers a small area) pattern: http://formontana.net/burst.html

Posted on Tuesday, August 10th, 2010 at 7:47am.

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